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, tribal, territorial and international partners and members of this committee. while the united states has made significant progress since the 9/11 attacks, we know threats from terror persist and continually evolve. we faced direct threats from al qaeda. we face growing threats of other foreign-based terrorist groups, which are inspired by al qaeda ideology, such as hq ap and al-shabaab. we must address threats that are homegrown as well as those that originate abroad. is threats are not limited to any one individual, group or ideology and as we have seen taxes employed by terrorists can be as simple as a homemade bomb or as sophisticated as the biologic threat or coordinated cyberattack. while we deal with a number of threats and threat actors at any given time, three areas merit special sustained attention. the first is aviation. christmas day 2000 plot, the october 2010th air cargo thread in the aqa peapod earlier this year would have targeted a u.s. bound airliner with explosives made clear that commercial aviation remains a target. terrace, especially aqap continue to seek ways to ci
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
control at the u.n. over the death of the american ambassador. the president of the united states noticeably nowhere to be seen and a brawl breaks out at a plant that makes apple product, forcing it to shut down. so, what's it going to mean for your new iphone? let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, iran slaps israel. iran's president ahminedjad is on american soil tonight and i was with him today. he was smiling, making joke, very relaxed as he took questions from a group of journalists at his hotel. he kept asking us to exchange views. not just ask questions. and in his answers, he called israel's threats to attack iran's nuclear program, in his words, a blip on the radar screen. >> translator: principally, we do not take seriously what the scientists ta say in threatening iran. >> so it's hard to imagine a more clear bow off than that, right? until you hear this. >> translator: they have been ok pieing those territories for the last 60 to 70 years with the support of force of the westerners. they have no roots there in history. iran is a va
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
are furious with the united states -- if you talk to the pakistanis, we want the opportunity, and we want that kind of social link. it would help to build ties with the united states, and put a lot more of our concentration into society where the face of society is the face of your neighbor, the engineer who works in a ditch, the face of a student, the face of your child who has come to america, etc.. our focus on what pakistan is. i am not sure that is going to be possible in the next two years, and this is my second point. i will get back to the international element in a minute. i think that it is right for us to make sure that we focus on the issue of the counterinsurgency issues that we have. we have to deal with that correctly. we have to deal with al qaeda. we have to do with international terrorism. until 2014, it is unlikely in my mind that we can have a major change. that does not mean we cannot do our hallmark. it does not mean we cannot get, for example, the dynamic, philanthropic sector of pakistan to work with the thorough -- very dynamic philanthropic sector in the states,
they hear that the president of the united states is no longer necessarily categorically calling egypt an ally? >> reporter: well, you know, quite honestly there's been a lot of confusion about what the u.s. role is right now and how the u.s. feels about egypt. before our revolution began, there was and continued to be a lot of anti-u.s. sentiment because of this support by various u.s. administrations for dictators in this region. but hearing the statement today, i think people are thinking, all right, well, whose side are you on because we're trying to get this revolution working and it has definitely confused a lot of people. >> all right, thank you so much for your time. i want to go directly to golden, colorado, where the president is speaking about the four who were killed in libya. >> serve in difficult and dangerous places all around the world, to advance the interests and the values that we hold dear as americans. and a lot of times their work goes unheralded, it doesn't get a lot of attention. but it is vitally important. we enjoy our security and our liberty because of the s
. >> warner: the president said the united states would work with the libyan government to track down the perpetrators. >> today, we mourn four more americans who represent the very best of the united states of america. we will not waver in our commitment to see that justice is done for this terrible act. and make no mistake, justice will be done. >> warner: for now, the pentagon ordered special units of marines to libya called "fast" teams, like this detachment shown training, to reinforce security at diplomatic sites in libya. and from tripoli, the president of libya's national assembly echoed the words of his american counterparts. >> ( translated ): we apologize to the united states of america and to the american people and to the whole world for what happened, and at the same time we expect the rest of the world to help us face these cowardly criminal acts. we refuse to use our country's land as a scene of cowardly reprisals. >> warner: those reprisals came apparently in response to internet clips of a film titled "the innocence of muslims" that crudely defamed the prophet muhamm
rising home prices. all these are more important to the united states than what's going on in europe. >> mark, how do you see it? you invested in europe these days or no? >> a little bit, maria. you know, i guess the thing i would say about europe and soon to watch on our shores is you're going to pay more and get less. i look forward to the dislocation between price and value. i think there are a few opportunities in europe selectively. a company we own called securitas, which is a man-guarded service. it trades for about 50 krona. we think it's worth 72. we get about a 6% dividend yield. there's an example where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. be
, the next step is to ask the united states military, will they and can they provide protection and to get -- request permission from the host government to allow them to come in, the u.s. forces, solely to protect the perimeter of the scene and the investigators while they are there. and best we can tell, we don't know if that's ever happened. >> so does it make sense to you, the claim that security is the concern for why fbi agents aren't on the ground? >> it doesn't make sense to me because i understand that there are procedures in place to try and mitigate against those risks and concerns and ways to deal with it. >> procedures that 16 days on, you would think could be in place. >> yes. exactly. >> bob, you have been talking to sources at the pentagon. you say the u.s. is really at a standoff here. how so? >> it's in a standoff, anderson, because the fbi and the military have decided they have to go in with extra protection. the military wanted to send in a special package which would have included counter battery because remember, the annex was attacked by mortars. this was a military
"fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. we have a smart show for you today. we'll talk mostly about what else has been going on in the world outside of the democratic national convention. >>> things have heated up with regard to iran and israel, with syria, with afghanistan. i've got a great panel to discuss all of it. anne-marie slaughter, richard haass, martin indyk. >>> then, a different spin on a familiar question in the presidential campaign. will americans be better off four years from now? one of the world's top bankers, roger altman, thinks so. harvard's niall ferguson isn't so sure. >>> next up, can't we just predict the election results now and be done with it? i'll ask nate silver, "the new york times'" brilliant statistician. >>> also, the crisis you don't know enough it that could have a big impact around the globe. >>> first, here's my take. both conventions are done, and what can we say about the
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
the united states rejects the efforts to denigrate religious beliefs of others, we must oppose the violence that took the lives of these public servants. again, the president will speak about this attack 10:35 eastern, we will carry it for you. and the u.s. embassy in cairo attacked. an american flag was ripped down and destroyed there and remember, we've given billions in aid to egypt. coming up in a few moments, ambassador john bolton will join us, where is america's mideast policy headed and should we keep paying? just this morning, germany's top court approved that nation's participation in a european bailout, paving the way for money printing in europe. and the markets like it. here is a look at dow futures, oil and gold. all of they will are up this morning, as of right now, they're all up. and they were up a whole lot more before the news of america's ambassador being killed in libya, before that news came out. we're up a lot more. we've got a big day for apple. a new iphone expected to be unveiled and mark zuckerburg, says it's time to double down on facebook, we're watching both bi
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
for the viewrs of others. and he disassociated the united states from the hateful video that was made in california that derotted the prophet mohammed and islam. and the president said this is his main point, he was passionate about it. the americans have an abiding belief in made a compelling case mr.. he also had a message for iran and that is that while we want to negotiate our differences through diplomacy if that's possible, that time is not unlimited. i thought it was a warning to the iranian government is a difficult deal with. i thought it was a important speech that the president gave yesterday in my. >> >> host: how about mitt romney can, you assess from what yoaf heard and have seen over the months. is there anything close to what you might call a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encaps late it? >> guest: he it a smart and successful person. he's been talking about foreign policy. it's not the issue he wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for r
. very clearly. we will wipe out israel. when the united states of america then we go after this sunday people, the christians to send you a message. you have to wake up many people think not in my backyard. if it is it is really is a year backyard. what is the connection between hezbollah and iran and venezuela? why do they work together and they fly a the slides from here to caracas? hatred of the shared values the american values of what you represent. this comes from our brand and will come to the shores of the united states. we will all remember the attack of 9/11. and to attack the towers of new york city, i can share with all due respect to our intelligence if al qaeda wanted to attack the towers but they chose to attack in the u.s. in washington d.c. to send a message. so for that i hope the united states whoever is elected will take a decision to stop the nuclear race today. something very interesting when you look at the arab leaders they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear so for that matter i think we would like to take action for the u.s. to sit idly by israel has to do i
has the judgment and character to be the president of the united states. this morning all of us were shocked to learn that chris stevens, our ambassador to libya, had been killed in an attack there, along with three other american diplomats, all murdered in what u.s. officials are now investigating as a possible terrorist attack on the anniversary of 9/11. while americans mourned, mr. romney saw a political opportunity. >> the administration was wrong to stand by a statement sympathizing with those who had breached our embassy in egypt instead of condemning their actions. in my view, a disgraceful statement on the part of our administration to apologize for american values. >> sympathizing with them all, apologizing for our values? this is rough talk and ugly stuff and president obama responded. >> there's a broader lesson to be learned here. governor romney has a tendency to shoot first and aim later and as president, one of the things i've learned is that you can't do that, that it's important for you to make sure that the statements that you make are backed up by the facts and tha
, in a sense, talking about, like, the 99%. think of, you know, some of the demonstrators m united states or in europe who have also said that the system is rigged against them. there might be some resonance. >> the american delegation, they walk out. clearly, that was not unexpected, but you did have some real power players who are sitting there. he does have a world audience, a wobbled stage. you've got russia wra. you have iran. china. the u.k. many of these other very powerful players here. how do they respond to them him? >> you know, if you look at russia and china, they believe that each country should be loued to do what it wants, and if they want to talk, let them talk. although russia does support the let's say movement to try to limit iran's ability to develop a nuclear bomb, and that would put them on the side of the united states. when it comes to kind of let them talk, they would sit there and listen to it. the united states decided not to even walk out. they didn't even walk in. they issued a statement. maybe we can read that statement if we have it. yes. coming from the sp
and egypt follow tuesday night's storming of the united states consulate in the libyan city of benghazi. the u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other staff members were killed in the attack. stevens is the first u.s. ambassador to be killed on duty since 1979. on wednesday, president obama vowed to bring to justice those responsible for the deaths in libya. >> the united states condemns in the strongest terms this outrageous and shocking attack. we are working with the government of libya to secure our diplomats and have directed my administration to increase security at posts around the world. make no mistake, we will work with the libyan government to bring to justice the killers who attack our people. >> the obama administration has dispatched an elite group of marines to the libyan capital of tripoli. in addition, two u.s. warships are reportedly headed towards the libyan coast and the u.s. has redeployed surveillance drones over libya. protests against them have also occurred in iraq, iran, tunisia, and bangladesh. >> at the center of the controversy is an online trailer
issues for the united states is how do we react to this? because we've got our fifth fleet stationed in bahrain. bahrain has been a friend of the united states for last several many decades and there is this tension between our commitment to human rights, our commitment to our democratic principles on the one hand which are vitally important for us but our real world, concrete interests insuring the flow of oil through the straits of hormuz which you covered. insuring that we have stable relations and influence with governments in the region like saudi arabia who have an in this. melissa: i want to talk about the video we're looking at here. he is trying to make the case, he said this repeatedly and very open about it when were doing the interview and didn't shy away from the question. when you have people in the streets throwing molotov cocktails you are putting in jeopardy the safety of the rest of our citizens. he makes it sounds like you have a few people causing trouble the other side would say these are a few people standing up for democracy that want a voice and this is a mona
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
-- the world of nation-state, those independent units that are truly sovereign and do not depend or take orders from anywhere else. the west can no longer do what it assumed it could do for its citizens. it needs to reach out for help. so you have got this system living in an uneasy coexistence with this globalize the world, and you say, "are we losing power?" though the very nature of power is different now than it used to be. you all in your textbooks say, cassette and these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other" -- "these are the elements of national power -- economy, this, that, and the other," but it is much more complicated now. >> i would add that the concept of what makes up national security has changed. it is a much broader field now. you have to deal with economic issues. you have to deal with cybersecurity. you have to deal with a world that is largely asymmetric. as we play it back on the 20th century, which was not that long ago, you almost yearn for the ordered ways of the 20th century. we had essentially a bipolar world, two different ideologie
they're policies are, look at the map. look at the map of the united states in terms of seas, prom mentors, harbors these, coast of the united states, the 13 colonies, was jam packed with great natural harbors. the whole coast of africa, thousands of miles, relatively few good harbors which hindered africa's development, but the east coast was packed with them, and the united states, the continental core of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the zone that was settled and waterways flowing in a convenient east-west fashion than the rest of the world's waterways combined. so i'm saying that americans -- we're important not only because of their ideas and their democracy but because of where we happen to live as well, and so that's why these things, like mountains matter. the himalayas matter. they have allowed india and china to develop into who completely disstink great world civilizations without having much to do with each other, through long periods of history. >> so let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly suitable geographical place with all th
. the united states drew a clear, red line. iran backed off. different lines can be drawn in the i iranian nuclear program. but to be credible, a line must be drawn first and foremost in one vital part of their program -- on their efforts to enrich uranium. let me explain why. any bomb consists of an explosive material and a mechanism to ignite it. the simplest example is fuse.der in and a you light the fuse and set off the gunpowder. the gunpowder is enriched uranium in regards to iran's nuclear program. the fuse is a detonator. for iran, amassing enough uranium is far more difficult than producing a nuclear fuse. for a country like iran, it takes many, many years to enrich uranium for a bomb. that requires thousands of center fuses spinning in tandem in big industrial plants. those are green plants are visible. they are still vulnerable. in contrast, iran could produce a record detonator, the fuse, in a lot less time. maybe under a year. maybe only a few months. the detonator can be made in a small workshop the size of the classroom. it might be difficult to find and target that workshop
, it is prescriptive that is in the dna of the united states. it is the way america works. this is very crudely put. the pakistan the narrative. the american narrative is similar the crude, but similarly useful. we give these guys tons of money. every time, they betray us. we keep coming back to them times of need. we give them money, but are they grateful? no, they are spiteful. it is emotional on both sides. it is not just a question of analysis on the way countries work. it is a question of the betrayal of people you want to love. there is this desire for more than just a relationship. not just a one-night stand, we want marriage. and the disappointment that comes with that. with those two narratives, it is my contention in 2008, with the end of dictatorship, there is an effort by people in both parties here in washington, but lead as the democrats came in, there is this effort to say we will break out of this narrative, we will break out of this straitjacket of the up and down relationship and we will put our money where our mouth is. we measure the tool we use to show we are serious, money. th
. it is the overtime that jews as a class have been expelled from anywhere in the united states. and around 1982, new information concerning the order had he come available from the association that published ulysses s. grant's papers. and so i began to prepare my remarks i put on the new suit and my talk seemed to be going well until i approached the subject of smuggling. ulysses s. grant was completely concerned about the north and the south. and since some of the smugglers that these troops caught were jews, he concluded that all jews or smugglers. that pointed out that we now know that smuggling was rampant was by no means a jewish monopoly. the continued rants own father, jesse grant was engaged in a clandestine scheme to move southern cotton northway. his partner was a jewish clothing manufacture and send them back. no sterner with those words out of my mouth and began to shift uneasily in the room and the pioneering of the american jewish historian buried his face in his hands. it was out of this world. i said something went terribly wrong. so the archives i didn't know what the problem was. s
do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
is unthinkable. and devastating. and when i become president of the united states, we will stop it. i will not cut our commitment to our military. >> the president once again blasted romney's hidden camera comments on the 47% of americans he dubbed victims of government dependence. >> i don't think we can get very far with leaders who writeoff half the nation as a bunch of victims who never take responsibility for their own lives. >> 47% of the people vote for the president no matter what. who -- >> the obama campaign turned romney's secretly recorded remarks into a devastating new ad claiming the gop nominee's words under the families and veterans. >> so my job is not to worry about -- they should take personal responsibility. >> romney two days in a row out to link national security to the nati sluggh recovery. he's seizing on new economic data revising down the 2nd quarter gdp. >> this is not just one quarter. this has been going on now for years. china's growing much faster than we. russia's growing faster than we. our economy needs to be reinvigorated. >> but not all the numbers
on for the past year and the worsening of relations between united states and pakistan. >> ok, when you're at the state department, you revise the u.s. government on relations between pakistan and afghanistan. mousavi video president obama put out, this thing -- you saw the video president obama put up, distancing america from the film. does that help? >> it does help. it is the first time united states is taking this kind of innovative pro-active measure. in some ways, you are trying to use this when already a tidal wave has started. it is hard to stop a tidal wave. >> is there anything washington can do? >> keep engaging on an ongoing basis. not this one a crisis happens. also, when we have disagreements with pakastani, we should explain ourselves to them. we should have kept them engaged. where we see the consequences of the collapse of the relationship as we saw today, then we try to come up with these measures, and often they are good, but they are too little to late. >> is that the problem? we have a short-term policy? >> we decided we should punish them, put pressure on pakistan.
to where they were, we were in belt largest expansion in the history of the united states. fix medicare. allow negotiations for prescription drugs. that will save $240 billion over 10 years, and finally, takeaway subsidies from the big oil companies. they are very profitable, but they do not need our help. what you end up with then is not a $1 trillion problem. you end up with a problem in the $200 billion range. raising the ceiling, a default for the nation. he spoke out against the fairfax chamber and other chambers, and now he is saying, "wait a minute. we cannot make cuts." when he is running as the guy who wants to make cuts. he has more sides then a rubik cube. >> what your so-called plan would do to jobs. i think you should be taking into account what the impact is on jobs, and our economy, which is a major, major concern. you talked about bob mcdonnell and eric cantor. what they did was pass a measure that would avert these devastating cuts to our national defense and jobs in virginia. what has this than that done? absolutely nothing. they have not passed a budget in 3.5 years.
, whether this man deserves to stay as president of the united states. he says he shares the pain and frustration of those who have lost their jobs but have never been more hopeful about america because of its people. this election would be the clearest choice in a generation. >> it will be a choice between two pads for america, between different visions for the future. >> this was not the rhetoric of four years ago. instead it workmanlike presence on the hard path to a better place. he derided his opponent as the same old failed policies of the past. >> have a surplus? try a tax cut. the deficit is too high? try another. stilicho coming on? take to bank tax cuts and rollbacks and regulations and call us in the morning. >> he mocked mitt romney's lack of foreign experience. >> you might not be ready if you cannot visit the olympics without insulting our closest allies. >> scarcely time to catch a breath and both hit the campaign trail. this is what greeted the president. >> we are not better off under president obama. fewer jobs, higher taxes on middle-class. fuel prices have doub
with a film made in the u.s. that ridicules the prophet mohammad. >> i have made it clear the united states had nothing to do with this video. it is an insult to muslims but america as well, that i have witnessed after nearly four years as president. i remain ever hopeful all right world that we live in. the war in iraq is over. american troops have come home. al qaeda's been weakened. and osama bin laden is no more. >> obama took the podium six weeks before the u.s. presidential election. he spent much of his time defending his record on foreign policy. >>> to coincide with the open egg ofhe general asell blame, british charity has released a video report on children in syria who are suffering from the escalating violence. many syrian children are haunted by the memory of seeing family members killed in front of their eyes. they have observed children becoming overaggressive. some have injured themselves due to severe psychological wounds. they say a school in the syrian capital, damascus, was bombed on tuesday and children's lives are at risk. the video report shows children sheltering in
in doing so, and these will not break the bonds between the united states and libya. >> the new prime minister has just been named after the recent elections, but the killing shows that in and when a new libya, armed groups continue to act seemingly with impunity. in cairo, demonstrators are blaming the u.s. for the film. it is a challenge for the muslim-lead government which has condemned the film while calling for protests. in libya the government will want this type of demonstration, pro america but against the film. the danger that in might be viewed across the region as legitimate anchor. -- anger. >> i am joined by the u.s. state official who served as the president of the council on foreign relations. we do not know the motives behind the attack, but what we do know is this is a very unstable country. we have a government that is moderate or pro-american, but that is not true of everyone. >> it underscores the reality it is one thing to out of authoritarian regimes, and it is something -- to ask authoritarian regimes, and it is something different to meet international obligati
is a big thing that iran knows and israel knows and the rest of the world knows that the united states is not going to let iran get a weapon or capability of getting a weapon. >> first of all, i think there's a balance. you need to strike a balance. what many including governor romney and congressman ryan and others around the world have said you have to be specific about this capability point. that you have to be able to signal to the iranians and the world that just building the weapon or getting close to building the weapon, is not the red line. having the tools at their disposal, that they would be easily assembled is a big problem and must be stopped because if they have the tools to assemble a weapon, easily assemble a weapon, it will have the impact that the iranian leadership wants. it will enable them to establish some set of region in the back their terror proxy operations through hezbollah and hamasimpum to just put pressure on friends and adversaries of ours and that's unacceptable and drawing that line does not mean you have to say at this specific moment at this specific
on the horizon. the united states is also currently a threat. the immediate concern is, many of you know that, is that under the current law there would be a dramatic tightening equal to about 4% of gdp. that's what is, refer to as the fiscal cliff. and that is good. it entails a contraction of 2% of gdp, and that is not good at all, especially if you consider the forecast of growth of the united states is pretty much in the range of 2%. so that is a racing any growth in the united states, would be the consequence of not dealing with the fiscal cliff and not dealing with the debt ceiling, which are both looming threats on the very short-term horizon. and it's not a threat just for the united states of america. it's the threat for the global economy, given the size of the u.s. economy and its linkages with many other countries around the globe. so we all hope that despite political calendars, which anywhere in the world, have a degree of unpredictability there will soon be enough political clarity and now political gains in order to actually focus on removing this uncertainty and making sure t
action to put our fiscal health in order and obviously that is a bigger challenge in the united states were adding a trillion dollars in debt year after year -- though how does it unplayed? >> that could serve as a source of entertainment to the canadian community. >> how do you think the u.s. does play out? >> i think that is a big risk and the frustrating thing in the u.s. is that the core is so strong and so good. you know we have illegal immigration by the way the average -- no growth over five years which includes a downturn but basically it's a big economy in 2% on a big economy as a big number and i think it goes. but it's very -- these problems are self-inflicted to a great extent and it makes it all the more frustrating and it must be frustrating to watch last summer with the debt ceiling and save why don't you compromise and why don't you get this done? i would say it's sometimes more frustrating to watch something that you can undo. it's like seeing it spiraling and you wish you could stop it and is within everybody's power to stop it. i think it's a political system to some
drones. it is coming from two respected universities in the united states. i think if this message is coming from independent academics and the united states, maybe it will be listened to. the report conclude the strikes are damaging and counterproductive. they estimate the overall number of top leaders killed among the drone victims is perhaps only 2%. they say while they are not killing the top tier or not be enough of the commanders, they are terrorizing an entire community. that is the word that they use, stressing that the drones hovering overhead night and day. they say communities are paralyzed by fear and many people are too frightened to go to import and gatherings. parent are keeping their children out of schools or the children themselves are too traumatized to go. the level of fear has been compared to the level of fear in the u.s. after 9/11. >> the report also says the vast majority of those victims are combatants or low-level combatants. americas argument is if it did not use drones, it would have to use much more interest of tactics to go after these combatants. >>
of residents, the united states agreed the tilt rotor aircraft will not be flown below 150 meters or over densely populated areas. after the test flights, the u.s. military plans to transfer the osprey to okinawa by the end of the month. the u.s. hopes to have the aircraft in full operation by mid october. many residents remain angry about the planned deployment. defense minister will visit okinawa next week to meet with the governor and other officials. he will explain the government did all it could to guarantee the safety of the ospreys. but the governor is still skeptical. >> translator: the central government its not addressing our concerns properly. >> he said the government lacks sincerity in the handling of the matter. >> all rigaw >> the united states has imposed sanctions to a firm in belarus for providing arms to syria. the company contributing to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. the officials say the firm provided parts for aerial bombs syrian forces used against rebels. the treasury department will freeze the assets in the u.s. and ban the firm from dealing w
to create cities that are private in honduras. this will save us money. >> the united states is going broke. we are watching one city after another going bankrupt and politicians not reigning in the spending . cities are losing funding from the state as well as the federal government. why in the bring in private enterprise. they have all of the carb and they can maintain levels of risk. gost is notorous for running business badly. >> what do you think. you think it is making them private. >> you am see a privatization waive in america. they are weighing in on the tol road and airports and turn into a private sector option. that's going to happen because of the budget. cities get 41 percent half of the revenue from the state. >> the state gets 36 percent from the government. the cities in san bernardino they are firing school crossing guards because they don't have the money. >> they have 12 cones in oregon and seeing funding cuts and you are seeing the wave of privatization. >> you know what, this is done in other countries around the world and this idea is frankly not knew. you think it wo
to the stories. it is a bigger story for the europe than the united states. >> in the united states we have a different set of worries we are seeing warnings from big american companies about their future earnings. we ended the third quarter and already we heard from fedex, caterpillar, big global companies that are citing europe. caterpillar is citing china, as well. what are you expecting out of the earnings period that we will see in the next couple of weeks? >> there is a slow down in the global economy. off recession in europe and a slowdown in china which is more significant than the chinese gdp numbers suggest. that is rippling to countries like korea, taiwan and japan. that is affecting the global economy. big global companies are hurt by that. more domestically-focused companies in the united states ought to do better. >> what about the fiscal cliff. it doesn't look like anything will happen until after the elections. we have the tax cuts expiring, spending programs expiring. a lot of people think it will lead to a recession in 2013. how do you think this gets resolved, an what sub
shakes the resolve of the united states of america. >> earlier today secretary of state hillary clinton stepped up her criticism of the anti-muslim film that first prompted the protests. >> to us, to me personally, this video is disgusting and reprehensib reprehensible. it appears to have a deeply cynical purpose to denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage. >> joining me now live from cairo, nbc's similar maceda. give us the best description of how things are right now. >> reporter: well, ironically benghazi remained calm today. if you look at it, perhaps the libyan government's quick crackdown there on those alleged perpetrators. four individuals were arrested today. there's a manhunt going on that might have had a tamping-down effort. even there in benghazi, the u.s. government is taking no chances. we understand that all u.s. personnel has now been or have been evacuated to tripoli and only emergency staff are kept at the embassy here. here in cairo it's another 24 hours of protests against that made in usa anti-islam film. overnight last night some dramatic scenes near the u.s
people. because the senate bill was inclusive and every woman member , republican, of the united states senate voted for it. everyone. that was the difference between the two bills. those who were included and a more specific group that are now included, which we think they ought to be, but we also think there aren't people include who had need to be. with all due respect i think my characterization was absolutely accurate. but it's interesting, mr. speaker, that we still haven't eabed the question -- answered the question. we tend to want to talk about other things. 98% of americans should not get a tax increase on january 1 that are making less than $250,000 individually as a family. i think we agree on that. mr. speaker, now i haven't heard that we don't agree on that but we agree on that which means there are 2% on which we do not agree. and that bill has not been brought to the floor that passed the united states senate dealing with that 98%. or 97% of small business. now, mr. speaker, it seems to me if we have agreement on 98% and the president of the united states will sign that
for a second term as president of the united states. [applause] >> find in the speech from both the democratic and republican conventions on line at the c-span video library. book tv coverage from the 2012 rose above reading festival continues. mary stuck the talks about her book, the finding americans, the presidency in national identity. >> now i have to try to be engaging. i think the most important thing to understand about the presidency in this context is that we always have choices. when you pick a president you are absolutely picking a particular kind of policy, but you're also picking a definition of our national identity -- identity. if you hear president and you like what they're saying to make you feel yourself call to the presidency than they are speaking to you about a sense of the national self that is deeply imbedded in all of us, and every time there's a presidential alexian will one of our previous presidents learned to his sorrow has the vision thing is really an important part of what the presidency does because we see ourselves as a nation through the ways that presidents
for the united states coming on and misleading the public. basically we have sent a letter to ambassador rice to explain herself. >> you know, there's a story out today, i didn't know if you saw it, senator, but the story essentially was that the united states government within 24 hours knew it was a pre-planned terrorist attack. your thought on that. because that indicts rice and whomever else was in this cover-up even more. >> that's right. ambassador rice came on the sunday morning programs and said that, in fact, it was a spontaneous reaction of course to the video. and in no way was an expression of hostility toward america. and you have to say killing four american heroes, quite honestly, attacking our consulate, if that's not hostility toward america, i don't know what it is. so, no, i think it's pretty apparent that the administration must have known, had information, and ambassador rice was sent out on the sunday programs to mislead the american public. i find that outrageous, and i think she needs to explain herself and explain herself fast. we should also call for an investigation.
a united states of europe? is this just a customs union? it's not so dissimilar to the formation of the united states, but the idea was let's not try to reach agreement on the end result because there is no consensus. let's take it one step at a time and develop the institutions as the problems come up. what was not foreseen as the context in which huge decisions would have to be taken emanating from the united states. the pressures are far greater than anticipated and they're being forced into making big decisions. we're going to find out if they're willing to make the sacrifices necessary to sustain it. yesterday, the peterson institute presented an interesting study whether there debt was sustainable. under most circumstances, the answer is yes. it seems surprising if the project would be abandoned in that context. >> next week, we have an interesting meeting for the fed. one friend of mine says the variants and potential outcomes is higher than most would remember. tell us how you think about the debate on an unconventional policy following the speech. >> i think there is one
right here in the united states. she joins us live tonight from bahrain. melissa, great to see you, safe and sound. you spent the night on the uss enterprise, the crown jewel of the navy's fifth fleet. stationed in bahrain where the iran threatened to shut down. this is a vessel with tremendous amount of history. tell us about it. >> oh, absolutely. it has been on the water for 51 years. it was parked off cuba during the cuban missile crisis. right now it is patrolling the arabian sea as you said, keeping the strait of hormuz open. rear admiral walter carter talked to us exclusive and we asked him how leaders in the area feel about iran's threat to shut down the strait of hormuz and here's what he had to say. >> like the entire global economy. they're very concerned about that and our job here is to make sure that freedom of navigation occurs through that very critical strait. it is well-known the amount of trade and commerce that goes through there. so just take a look what goes through there. liquified natural gas, huge product that comes out of the country of qatar. oil products impor
monti, and we'll look at where we stand given the issues we're talking about in the united states. >> very good, we look forward to that and over there in europe, they promised more stimwlus this bond buying program announced yesterday. and over here with disappointment, the expectation of more fed action has been heightenned. earlier on cnbc, paul ryan said central bank action made things worse, not better. >> you have a story of central banks stepping in to bail out lackluster fiscal policy. you look at the draghi press conference yesterday for one of the biggest reasons why, but there is no substitute for good fiscal policy. you can't expect central bankers to bail us out all the time. >> draghi said as much yesterday. >> our next guests think their actions stop the depression and are necessary. mark, why do you think representative ryan is right? >> let's talk about providing liquidity in 2008 and the actions sense. i think most of the problems in europe today and in america today are not problems of liquidity. there's not a lack of liquidity in our banking system or corporate
home and figure out what they will do and the relationship they will have with the united states and control radical islamism in their country. >> congressman allen west will join us for tomorrow for a special edition of justice. definitely the question is, be those governments control the radical islamist. good evening, ambassador. >> good tock with you. >> ambassador, why is this happening? >> i think what is been going across the middle east for the several yearings has been a wave of radical islamism. a high loo politicizing version of an extreme interpretation of the muslim religion and it is it gaining force it most vividly in the terrorist actions that hes bollah and hamas. and we see it as the 18 months of what some people thought was arab spring. it was not a democracy movement and may have been against the rulers in libya and tunisia and else where. but it was not for a swift democracy. the proof is in the streets that's threat we face. >> this is it a country we help tod liberate. benghazi is a city that we defended. how could we not have known that based on the instan
the united states. he has served as president as the atlantic monthly magazine, executive vice president of u.s. news and world report, and the co-editor of roll-call. we are delighted that he is here to comment on the subject. >> i want to begin by congratulating the doug and bill. this is an excellent study and i have to say i have read about three dozens of these and i even wrote one of them, which some people consider the best. this is an excellent report, for reasons i will go into. it urges america to show how to organize the government to do that. the current administration, not just the war of ideas as an activity, but the very phrase is now anathema, a sad development. this became evident to me when i started meeting with members of the foreign-policy team and was warned it would be unwise if i wanted to have any impact on their thinking to use the term "war of ideas." i am not sure which of the two is more offensive. my own authorization was clear. in the long run, winning the war on terror means winning the battle of ideas. it could not be clearer than that. around the same time, p
is that the undocumented would then stay in the united states. so some people not liking this. >>> a single mother of 4 losing big time against the big-time record labels in the minneapolis "star tribune." an appeals court reinstating a jury's decision to level. listen to this, a $222,000 judgment against jamie thomas rassett. the court reduced damages to $54,000. the recording industry accused her of illegally downloading more than 1700 files. >>> all right, while you were sleeping a decision made thousands of miles away that will have a dramatic affect on the world economy and your stock portfolio. yeah, a court across the world that holds the global economy in its hands. the story coming up. [ female announcer ] caroline penry began using olay total effects in 2001. since then, there's been one wedding, 2 kids, and 43 bottles of olay total effects. so in spite of 185 tantrums 378 pre-dawn starts and a lot of birthdays, caroline still looks amazing. thanks to the trusted performance of olay you can challenge what's possible. 60 years, millions of women, real results. but proven technologies allow nat
at this crisis? speak of the united state unites attacked september 11, 11 years ago, and united states attacked september 11 yesterday. what does that mean? the united states territories, the embassy, it was egypt and libya. were they coordinated attacks? when the president came out, as you rightly did, he should have followed that by saying these attacks are not going to be tolerated, we will hold the host governments responsible for this. some indication even in egypt there was advanced warning these attacks are coming which is why the americans had gotten out of that embassy. the president of the united states needs to say to those countries who will hold you responsible, have to protect our people, you have to have better protection of our people and if you don't do that we will reassess our relationship with you because if you don't stand strong right now, this is what happened to jimmy carter and why ronald reagan was elected. jimmy carter did not do something strong. he apologized, said let's try to negotiate and that is the kind of response i heard from president obama. dagen: did we ha
offered in the united states. in fact, in the world. and net, it is a very under-utilized program. no matter how hard we try to market it and sell it to our employees as a great resource, many people do not take advantage of it. it may be because it is viewed as, sort of, mental health. that -- what if my colleagues found out. so this is where corporate culture that walked the talk on health-seeking behavior can really make a difference. i learned this in my role. that's when i tell my -- why i tell my story. i tell my story to my employees, too. i say it is ok, because i believe you all need to seek whatever help you need to seek to be able to help with well being and also to do what's necessary to prevent suicide. and it really can make a difference. we have designed a comprehensive and effective suicide prevention program. we make a wide array of resources available to our members, employees, family members, to our clients' employees and family members, especially advocating for individuals to know when and how to seek help. this is available as well in the -- on the -- in the
in egypt, say is turkey the model, i say there is no good model. even the united states of america is not a model if you are serious about freedom, dignity and also the power of the state. because i'm ready to talk about -- i will come to that point about separating, you know, the state from religion. but if you separate or distinguish the state from religion, tell me what you put instead of religion. because what we are facing in the west now -- and we all know this as citizens -- i live in europe, you live in the united states of america, and we all know that the problem that we have with our democracies now is not the dramatic decision of religions, but some magic decisions of transnational corporation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to think anything. and we call it democracy, we're still today dealing with powers that are beyond the democratic procedures. the banks, transnational corporations. and we are facing with people who are deciding. for example, in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats who are coming to solve the problem. we never el
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are -- the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 354 and the nays are 62. the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 355 and the nays are 62, 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the the gentlewoman from california, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 5865 on which the the yeas and nays are ordered as amended. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 5865, a bill to promote the growth and competitiveness of american manufacturing. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill as amended. members will record their votes by electr
to building bridges between the united states and the arab and muslim world, particularly libya. and i think this is going to sour a lot of americans about the future trajectory of the middle east, about the direction in which the arab spring is headed. and i think particularly this is tragic for syrians. syrians who are now under siege or around 20,000 syrians have been killed by the regime of assad and i think many syrians were hoping for an outside intervention or outside aid to provide some type of save zones. and i think the reality is that after the united states and nato had gone into libya it oust gadhafi, i think there will be far less appetite to want on do anything in syria. >> probably also raises huge questions about money from america that is going to fund some of these governments particularly in egypt where it's $1.5 billion plus another billion that was being put together in a package right now. how do you think that plays out in congress at this point? >> that's absolutely right. egypt is a country which has i think the second or third largest aid package from the united st
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
in the united states who have been educated in our schools, to give them the opportunity to stay here. you know, wouldn't we rather be known as a country of dreamers, than a country of illegal aliens? [applause] and as we saw last night, this is the commander in chief who finally brought osama bin laden to justice. [applause] now that is presidential leadership. but even before barack obama was elected president, we knew he was going to be a great leader. we knew it when he chose joe biden as his running mate. [applause] joe was the perfect choice, because like the president, he had lived the american dream, going from humble middle-class roots, to the united states senate, to the vice presidency of the united states. [applause] and we all know from his incredible speech last night that he has been side by side with the president's, fighting to make sure that we open the doors of opportunity for all americans, working to create good jobs and to invest in education, to make health care and retirement and schools affordable for everyone. it is what he has fought for his entire career. [applause]
. the united states of america with their two presence in afghanistan with peace and stability, then you are personally the national interest of pakistan because the known and unknown objective of pakistan within the region is also peace and stability. why talk about the regional approach is to give you confidence for your buck the talk of first doing that. that she must not look at us, but she must look at us from the lens have today in the toasty today the future that pakistan wants for itself as that of peace and stability in. and we have a peaceful, stable region, everything else will work great. so is a march on i think we need to send each other messages. one of the means is to send that message out, that we are keen to work together to ensure that in afghanistan we are able to achieve together long sustainable fees, less admitted that we are not able to achieve. so let's work together. this put our energies together, our resources together. let's not blame each other. let's find time to sit together to work through this together because as i said, this is something that in this re
in the british foreign office in the united states should have the capacity to keep our eye on more than one war upon. >> i suppose the key was to negotiate. it didn't work that way. if it didn't work that way in a western democracy, the do very little chance of the work in that way in afghanistan, therefore the extent to which there is an engagement, whether it's track to her otherwise with the taliban if they think they're important because you can wait a long, long time for the kind of progress in security level, which may never happen. >> you're absolutely right. i keep using that as an example. there was no military plan that has that is the subject to defeating the insurgency. our strategy is not defeating the insurgency. >> affair in which he said among the afghan leadership. >> i think they generally want assessment. they have huge differences on what terms are prepared to accept. if you talk to afghan women, they are very worthy attempts of settlement will be to their detriment. you also talk and they don't want to give up the amount of power they've had. they've had more power than the
romney said take a look at gdp numbers over in china and russia, the united states is falling behind those countries. he said that the united states needs to be doing better than europe. that's one of his big go-to lines. europe is not working for europe. it isn't going to work here in the united states. so these two campaigns are going to be going at it over the economy. we heard president obama throw out a very attack line talking about the mother jones video that came out. he said in front of that crowd, he said when i look out at this crowd i don't see a lot of victims, referring to what mitt romney said in that hidden camera video. they're talking about defense stuff. but the economy looming over everything else. >> thank you, jim. appreciate it as always. president obama and mitt romney face to face. first presidential debate wednesday night. watch it live, 7:00 eastern or cnn.com. >>> also another huge story that has everybody talking. no kidding. the nfl and its refs. right now nfl commissioner roger goodell is taking questions at a presser in new york. let's see what he's go
the united states. ever. it is likely the iranian's president final speech to the u.n. attacking the united states and railed on israel calling its people "uncivilized." this is the holiest jewish holiday of the year. both presidential nominees crossing paths in ohio today. voters in ohio cast ballots in days. we will look at the poll that shows a candidate leading well outside the margin of error. the rising cost to stay in touch. smartphones can be expensive. we know that. just wait until you hear how much they are cutting into a lot of family budgets. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, the iranian president, ahmadinejad, today delivered what could be the last antiisraeli american and antiisraeli ranting in front of the u.n. the american delegation did not walk out. the american delegation never even showed up. they were out before he took the podium. the president, ahmadinejad, has less than a year left in the second and final term. the united states and israel have accuseddive ran of working toward a nu
just search "state of the union." "fareed zakaria gps" is next for our viewers here in the united states. >>> this is "gps," the "global public square." welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world. i'm fareed zakaria. on today's show we'll bring you some of the best interviews of the year. first up, the most powerful man in america. no, not what you're thinking. that's what some people call grover ronquist. who? he is behind the gop pledge never to raise taxes. then, who really creates jobs in this country? is it the 1% or the 99%? i'll talk to two 1%-ers who vehemently disagree. >>> next up, the politics of outer space. america won the race to the moon, but that was 40 years ago. the u.s. is essentially sitting on the bench in the current space race. will that hurt it back here on earth? >>> also, the world's great historian of the middle east, bernard lewis, on the past and future on that part of the world. >>> but first, here's my take. so i thought i would take a step away from politics, the conventions and the campaigns and look around the world. you know,
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
that open new plants and train new workers right here in the united states of america we can reward those companies that build right here and double their exports. we can create 1 million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years. you can make that happen. >> i want to create a future where everyone who wants a job can find a job. where no senior figures for their security of their retirement and every parent knows that their child will get an education that leads to a good job and a bright horizon. and unlike the president, i have a plan to create 12 million new jobs. host: has either campaign in specific on how they plan to create 1 million new jobs? politics is not my area, but from what i have followed i have not seen at all specifically this is going to happen. its romney's plan, one of five. is to reduce the deficit. but it is not clear how it leads to more jobs in a direct way. obviously, overall, a strong quake -- stronger economy and reduced debt leads to a better economic environment. but as you cut contractors, teachers, whatever -- anytime government is cutting spending, c
his speech. netanyahu has been critical of the united states, saying there is no more time for diplomacy on iran's nuclear program. plus, mira sore vino stops about her crusade to stop human trafficking and tomorrow you will meet a teacher who struggled a teacher that strug d for years and then found a way to profit off of what she was doing in the classroom and it turned her in to a millionaire. it's an amazing story. it is "out front" tomorrow. here's piers morgan tonight. >>> tonight, nuclear threat in the east, mahmoud ahmadinejad says he is the victim. >> no one feels secure or safe, even those who have stockpiled thousands of atomic bombs and other arms in their arsenals. >> we hear what will it take to keep iran from getting the bomb. >> i don't see victims. i see hard-working ohioans. >> we can't afford four more years like the last four years. we have to get the economy going again. >> campaigns go head to head. what the latest means. nate silver will be asked if romney can win and deepak chopra, wesley clark and ameerah al-taweel. things get lively at the clinton
. that is greater than all android phones combined in the united states. with that kind of intent to buy it, we will see a large market. david: they're going to be selling $99. of course that is the older version. the cheaper price also comes with less connections in the iphone 5 does. there'does the 1.2 gigabytes peh compared to those with slower connection. >> apple is covering all the price points. that is a keeping time to address a large body of consumers. you will have the iphone for which is a great phone given away for free on contract. i think they're doing a great job of going up against the competition and frankly at this point over 50% of americans already have smart phones, so getting into mainstream, mom and pop buying smart phones and it has to be really easy to use and apple has set the gold standard. david: what about the corporate market, lot of corporations going for the blackberry. is this going to tap into that market? >> the iphone has been adopted by companies a lot of the fortune 500 are already using iphones. that sai set in a couple of weee will have blackberry jam whe
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
be described as young a. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day fo. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights. kerrey has done such a good job. there is very little to add. then i will talk about the business cases. the two. i would make about the act is first to think about why it is the justices would get involved. these cases are not in the docket. in the illustration in to help the court work. the justices have a rule that says if we're point to strike down a federal statute, that is our job. they're likely to step in. the voting rights act case, several of them come on a peel. you have to ask the supreme court to grant review. there are slivers of cases in the united states coal that there is a right to go to the supreme court. they have different ways of dodging them. we almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. the second point out and make is what to expect from the pivotal justices. this is at the cente
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